Yahoo!Finance: ‘Inclusive’ Way Needed For Data Processing

‘Inclusive’ Way Needed For Data Processing

Dr. Wanli Min, a leading expert in industrial intelligence and business innovations in China, who is also founder and CEO of North Summit Capital, was invited to share and exchange his opinion on digitalization with worldwide technology entrepreneurs and government officials at the ninth International Open Innovations Forum.

MOSCOW, RUSSIA / ACCESSWIRE / Octobere 21, 2020 / Hundreds of world-leading business representatives, government officers, academics, and industry influencers gathered virtually to participate in the ninth International Open Innovations Forum, one of the largest annual technology events in the world, attracting tens of thousands of audiences across the globe.

Under the theme of “New Digital Normal. Are We Ready for the Changed World”, the forum lasts from October 19th to 21st with three topics for discussion on each day – “humancentric society, survival economy, and futuristic technology”.

Dr. Wanli Min, a leading expert in industrial intelligence and business innovations in China, who is also founder and CEO of North Summit Capital, was invited to share and exchange his opinion on digitalization with worldwide technology entrepreneurs and government officials.

During a panel discussion on the digitalization of public administration, he stated: “The fact is that the world is going to be digitized more or less. This trend is not going to be reversed. And we have to embrace the trend, to drive the trend with the power of technology

And this requires an “inclusive” way to deal with data, said Dr. Min.

“The government side, which is a huge public data aggregator and collector, haven’t put the data in active utilization for the benefit of the citizens; while on the other hand, the citizens have to understand the government agenda, and participate actively in and contribute to data collection,” he explained, adding that individuals couldn’t just wait for “getting benefits without any contributions”.

Dr. Min shared an example of how health data collection can benefit those who provide their data and also people around them during the COVID-19 pandemic – the application of health-status QR codes in China.

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Several months ago, when China was heavily hit by the novel coronavirus, QR codes are introduced in most cities. The green code means people have little chance of having been infected, while residents with yellow and red ones must be held under quarantine and report their health information daily until they are tested negative and get back their green ones for travel.

Although the pandemic is under control in China at present, people in most cities who want to enter public spaces or take public transport vehicles are still required to show their green health codes. Those who don’t have smartphones, especially the elderly and children, can pass with valid paper documents.

“We can see this has already made a huge difference in terms of containment of the pandemic,” Dr. Min said. “In summary, the policy initiation, the policy design, and the policy enforcement will all benefit from digital technology and fundamentally shake up the intervention between the public service provider, the government and the citizens.”

“I believe the future of the digital world is limitless, and the potential of data will be everywhere,” Dr. Min said. “We are advancing to a better solution…for the ultimate benefit of people.”